#JeSuisCharlie- Freedom of Speech and the Fear of Saying What You Feel in 2015

As longterm readers and friends know, I don’t tend to not voice an opinion, no matter how much shit I know it will generate if not held publicly and widespread by the majority.

I’m not just talking about blogging issues. I’ve given my views on politics, why I think Medway was bound to vote UKIP down to being a town populated by people told what to think by The Sun. I have voiced negativity about the behavior of the McCanns and how they were wrong to go away from their children for a drink.

I did touch on issues surrounding ISIS, in the respect that I don’t believe those who disappear over to fight with these Extremists should automatically and unquestionably be allowed to decide to return the second they miss their iPods and meals in Nandos. I made my feelings known on the Paedophile shame in Rotherham last year too.

However many times I have sparked debate, or disagreed with others, I have always without question called on my right to opinion. To freedom of speech and expression.

The horrifying, and so very needless deaths in Paris at the offices of satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo go against everything the majority of us hold dear. The ability to make light of an ever more bloody situation brought on by religion. The ability to say what we feel via the medium of witty art.

They say the pen is mightier than the sword, but as more and more cases of extremism against social commentators, both threats and actions, occur, one is left with the fear that, should my posts, or posts of friends, or other media people offend someone in a supposedly peaceful religion according to their religious texts, do we too run the risk of freedom of speech equaling death?

I am proud that the people of France peacefully took to the streets with flags, holding pens aloft. No doubt though this will antagonise certain very mentally unbalanced people further.

I personally hate the idea of a world where a joke will end with violence. Fear of reprisal meaning art and opinion, the ability to spark debate, goes underground and hidden.

What do we do next? How do we claw back our freedom in a peaceful way, and can we? Do our Politicians have the answer? I fear this is doubtful, and that there is no longterm answer let alone a solution to bring about peace in all religions and races.

Let’s hope the light of debate, of art, and commentary never goes out for good, and long may freedom of speech and disagreement reign true.

Je Suis Charlie

La plume est plus puissante que l’epée


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